Faculty & Staff

Gwen Robbins Schug

Visiting Professor
Biological Anthropology and Bioarchaeology
Ph.D., University of Oregon (2007)
Email: gmrobbin@uncg.edu
Curriculum Vitae
Research Website: https://gwenrobbinsschug.academia.edu/

Research Interests

  • Bioarchaeology
  • Human dental and skeletal biology
  • Human-environmental interactions
  • Climate and socio-cultural change
  • Paleopathology
  • South Asia

Courses Taught

  • ATY 253: Introduction to Biological Anthropology
  • ATY 359: Forensic Anthropology
  • ATY 400x: Paleopathology
  • ATY 400x: Archaeology of South Asia
  • ATY 400x: Bioarchaeology

Personal Statement

I am a Professor of Anthropology at Appalachian State University (2006-present) and a Visiting Professor at UNC Greensboro (2020–2021). My research focuses on adaptive challenges for human communities, including human-environmental interactions and climate change throughout the Holocene in South Asia and more recently, in Bronze Age Oman and modern Italy. My research has been funded by Wenner Gren, Fulbright, and the American Institute of Indian Studies, among others. I am the author of Bioarchaeology of Climate Change (2011, UPF) co-editor of A Companion to South Asia in the Past (2016, Wiley-Blackwell), editor of the Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Climate and Environmental Change (forthcoming in 2020, Routledge), 18 published journal articles and 12 book chapters.

Books

  • Robbins Schug, G. (Ed.) (In press, 2020). The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Climate and Environmental Change. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Robbins Schug, G., & Walimbe, S.R. (Eds.) (2016). A Companion to South Asia in the Past. Boston: Wiley Blackwell.
  • Robbins Schug, G. (2011). Bioarchaeology and Climate Change: A View from South Asian Prehistory. Gainesville: University Press of Florida
  • Robbins, G., Misra, V.D., Pal, J.N., & Gupta, M.C. (2004). Mesolithic Damdama: Dental histology and age estimation. Allahabad: University of Allahabad Press.

Articles and Book Chapters

  • Robbins Schug, G. (In press, expected 2020). Ritual, urbanism, and the everyday: Mortuary behavior in the Indus civilization. In S. DeWitte, & T. Betsinger (Eds.), The Bioarchaeology of Urbanization (pp TBD). Chum: Springer.
  • Nystrom, K.C., Robbins Schug, G. (In press, expected 2020). A bioarchaeology of social inequality and environmental change. In G. Robbins Schug (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Climate and Environmental Change (pp. TBD). Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Miller, M., Robbins Schug, G., Pagani, L., Carrara, N. (In press, expected 2020) A bioarchaeology of madness: Modernity, pellagra, and the rise of the manicomio system in the Veneto Region of Italy. In G. Robbins Schug (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Climate and Environmental Change (pp. TBD). Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Robbins Schug, G. (In press, expected 2020). A bioarchaeology of climate and environmental change. In G. Robbins Schug (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Climate and Environmental Change (pp. TBD). Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Robbins Schug, G. (2020). Maternal forces: Biological, behavioral, and emotional aspects of plagiocephaly in the past. In S. Halcrow, & R. Gowland (Eds.), The Mother-Infant Nexus in Anthropology: Small Beginnings, Significant Outcomes (pp 235–256). Chum: Springer.
  • Robbins Schug, G. (2020). The Long View of Climate Change and Human Health. Anthropology News, 61(2), 26–28.
  • Stephens, L., Fuller, D., Boivin, N., Rick, T., Gauthier, N.,.… & Ellis, E. [& 114 others in alphabetical order, including #88 G. Robbins Schug]. (2019) Archaeological assessment reveals Earth’s early transformation through land use. Science, 365, 895–902.
  • Robbins Schug, G., *Parnell, E.K., & Harrod, R. (2018). Changing the climate: Bioarchaeology responds to deterministic thinking about human–environmental interactions in the past. In J. Buikstra (Ed.), Bioarchaeologists Speak Out: Contemporary Issues, Deep Time Perspectives (pp 133–159). Chum: Springer.
  • Halcrow S, Killgrove, K., Robbins Schug, G., Huffer, D., Arriaza, B., Jungers, W., & Gunter, J. (2018). On engagement with Anthropology: A critical evaluation of skeletal and developmental abnormalities in the Atacama preterm baby and issues of forensic and bioarchaeological research ethics. Response to Bhattacharya et al. “Whole-genome sequencing of Atacama skeleton shows novel mutations linked with dysplasia” in Genome Research. International Journal of Paleopathology, 22, 97–100.
  • Robbins Schug G. (2017). A hierarchy of values: The bioarchaeology of order, complexity, health and hierarchy at Harappa. In H. Klaus, A.R. Harvey, M.N. Cohen (Eds.), Bones of Complexity: Osteological Indicators of Emergent Heterarchy and Hierarchy (pp 363–289). Gainesville: UPF.
  • Bertrand, B., Robbins Schug, G., Collard, T., Naji, S., **Polet, C. (2016). Age-at-death-estimation in pathological individuals. A complementary approach using teeth cementum annulations. International Journal of Paleopathology, 15, 120–127.
  • Robbins Schug, G., (2016). Begotten of Corruption? Bioarchaeology and “othering” of leprosy in South Asia. International Journal of Paleopathology, 15(4), 1–9.
  • Robbins Schug, G., & *Blevins, K.E. (2016). The center cannot hold: A bioarchaeology of environmental crisis in the second millennium BCE, South Asia. In G. Robbins Schug, & S.R. Walimbe (Eds.), A Companion to South Asia in the Past (pp 255–273). Boston: Wiley Blackwell.
  • Robbins Schug, G., & Walimbe, S.R. (2016). Introduction. In G. Robbins Schug, & S.R. Walimbe (Eds.), A Companion to South Asia in the Past (pp 1–10). Boston: Wiley Blackwell.
  • Robbins Schug, G. (2016). Demography. In J.R. Lukacs, & J.N. Pal (Eds.), Holocene Foragers of North India: The Bioarchaeology of Mesolithic Damdama (pp 121-131). Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.

Current Projects

My research is focused on an examination of how human skeletal remains from archaeological contexts can inform us about human-environmental relations (specifically climate change) in the past. Another current project is looking at the effects of globalization, modernity, and institutionalization in 19th and 20th century northeastern Italy using skeletal collections from the Università di Padova Museum of Anthropology. This project is part of a Bioarchaeological field school conducted in collaboration with professors Nicola Carrara and Luca Pagani. Specifically, we are considering the biocultural experiences of pellagra, tuberculosis and syphilis for patients at Sant’Anna Ospedale in Ferrara and for TB patients from Bologna.

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